Yearly Archives: 2015

Daily World News Digest, 2 December 2015

Former Sri Lanka President advocates Special Court on missing persons and war crimes

Daily News from Sri Lanka reported today that former President, Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, yesterday said that reconciliation cannot happen without accepting the mistakes of the past and the injustices committed to minorities. Former President Kumaratunga was addressing the press as the Head of the Office for National Unity and Reconciliation (ONUR) appointed by President Maithripala Sirisena. ‘’The previous Government’s lack of accountability made us lose face with the international community’’. She added that the accountability process would be four-pronged, to include a Missing Persons Office, a Special Court for investigation of cases of war crimes, a compensatory instrument, and a mandate to ensure non-recurrence. http://bit.ly/1RlF4ie

Security agents say missing youth have joined al Shabaab

The Star, a daily from Kenya, carried a story today saying that there is concern that thousands of youth reportedly missing from learning institutions…

Daily World News Digest, 1 December 2015

Argentina Plaza de Mayo grandmothers find child 119

The BBC carried a story today saying that Argentine campaign group Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo have found the son of a woman who was held captive by the military junta in the 1970s and 80s. The man, Mario Bravo, was taken from his mother as an infant while she was in jail and given to military government supporters to bring up. Unusually, his mother was not executed but was released and is still alive. Mario is the 119th child to be found by the Grandmothers. They have worked for decades to reunite families with missing children, stolen by the junta. Mr Bravo had a DNA test done in 2007 and his DNA was compared with a bank of genetic samples collected by the Grandmothers from families searching for their children. http://bbc.in/1XDyC5M

Cyprus: CMP ready to dig in military zones in…

Daily World News Digest, 30 November 2015

Iraqis find 3 more mass graves in formerly IS-held Sinjar

The Associated Press reported on 29 November that Kurdish officials said three more mass graves have been found in the northern town of Sinjar, where Kurdish forces backed by heavy US-led airstrikes drove out Islamic State militants earlier this month. The discovery brings the total number of burial sites in the area to five and the total number of bodies uncovered to between 200 and 300, according to local officials. “The important thing is that the site is secure,” said Kevin Sullivan of the International Commission on Missing Persons. “The site needs to be controlled, for example, by police or under authority of a prosecutor and the bodies need to be exhumed in a systematic way with any identifying artifacts,” as wallets and scraps of clothing, he said. ‘’The proximity of many of the sites in Sinjar to active front…

Daily World News Digest, 27 November 2015

Blast at market in Nigeria kills 32

The Voice Herald, a news portal, reported today that the explosions in Kano, the country’s second-biggest city, occurred near the center of the city on Wednesday. No organization has yet claimed credit for the attack, but it is consistent with the behavior and within the territory of Boko Haram, a militant Islamic group that has been responsible for thousands of deaths in Nigeria since 2003. At least 105 soldiers from the battalion and two senior officers were feared “missing” following the attack on Wednesday, security sources said. “Over 100 persons injured and 14 others lost their lives in today’s market bomb blast in Kano”, said Sani Datti, a spokesman for the National Emergency Management Agency (Nema). Suspected Boko Haram militants have carried out attacks in neighboring Chad, Niger and Cameroon in recent weeks. http://bit.ly/1NbAvRx

Daughter wins right to exhume body of father who…

Daily World News Digest, 26 November 2015

Indigenous Canadians comprised 23% of country’s murder victims in 2014

The Guardian carried a story on 25 November saying that almost a quarter of homicide victims in Canada last year were aboriginal, even though the country’s indigenous people account for just 5% of the population, newly released federal statistics show. Twenty-three percent of the country’s 516 homicide victims in 2014 were aboriginal, making them almost six times more likely than non-indigenous Canadians to become victims of deadly violence, the federal statistics agency reported on Wednesday. The newly elected Liberal government has committed to launching a national inquiry by next summer into the nearly 1,200 indigenous women and girls who have disappeared or been murdered in the country in the past three decades. http://bit.ly/1N9qEvn

Mexico police use of excessive force led to deaths of six people

Reuters reported on 25 that Mexico’s federal police used excessive force that resulted in five deaths,…

Daily World News Digest, 25 November 2015

Former Foreign Minister slams access given to UN group in Sri Lanka

Colombo Gazette, a daily from Sri Lanka, reported on 24 November that former Foreign Minister, Professor Peiris raised concerns over the decision taken by the Government to grant access to a UN group to visit the Navy camp in Trincomalee. The UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances last week raised concerns over secret underground detention cells at the Trincomalee navy camp believed to have been used to detain people now reported missing. Peiris said that no country will allow a foreign group to have access to its Navy camp yet the current Sri Lankan Government allowed the Working Group to inspect the Trincomalee Navy camp. The Former Foreign Minister accused the Group of making false claims after visiting the camp. http://bit.ly/1Xq7bMV

New European border restrictions on refugees, migrants violate human rights

UN News Center issued a news…

Effective Tools to Account for the Missing

HM Queen Noor 1

Effective tools have been developed to address the global missing persons crisis created by natural disasters, conflict and migration, Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan said on Monday during a presentation at the Blavatnik School of Government in Oxford.

“The issue of the missing is no longer being tackled solely as a humanitarian issue and by humanitarian actors, but as a public law issue to be addressed by public institutions including domestic courts, prosecutors and law enforcement,” Queen Noor said.

Describing the evolution of the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP), which emerged from the post-war recovery process in the Western Balkans 20 years ago, she said ICMP could serve as a model for creating “a light but efficient modern international organization”.

ICMP cooperates with governments and other authorities in locating and identifying persons missing as a result of conflicts, human rights…

Daily World News Digest, 24 November 2015

Missing and murdered indigenous women a ‘’social systemic issue’’

Saskatoon Star Phoenix, a daily from Canada, reported on 23 November that police Chief of Saskatoon in central Canada, Clive Weighill, said cases of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls cannot be solved by police alone. “This is a big social systemic issue. We have to stop treating this as a crime issue,” Weighill said in an interview Monday. The police department has revamped its policy on missing persons cases in recent years and now more officers work missing persons cases, he added. However, many of the victims’ families have negative experiences when dealing with police. Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, a member of Women Walking Together — a grassroots organization supporting families of missing and murdered women — said police need a more comprehensive strategy for reporting missing persons cases to the media, she added. http://bit.ly/1HjCO8W

UN urges deployment of more peacekeepers to South…

Daily World News Digest, 23 November 2015

Prime target: How serial killers prey on indigenous women

The Globe and Mail, a daily from Canada, reported on 22 November that indigenous women in Canada are roughly seven times more likely than non-indigenous women to die at the hands of serial killers, according to a Globe and Mail analysis that found at least 18 aboriginal females were victims of convicted serial killers since 1980. Aboriginal women are being killed and disappearing across the country at an alarming rate. The RCMP have said 70 per cent of the indigenous women slain in Canada meet their fate at the hands of an indigenous person. An unprecedented 2014 RCMP report found 1,181 aboriginal females were killed or went missing across the country between 1980 and 2012. In some of the cases the victims’ loved ones said that police were initially dismissive of their concerns and did not appear to take the missing-person…

Daily World News Digest, 20 November 2015

In Kosovo, UN efforts focused on promoting stability and political progress

UN issued a news on 19 November saying that the UN Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) is continuing to focus its efforts on promoting stability, political progress and respect for human rights. “I arrived amid renewed political turbulence in Kosovo, and developments during the past week have produced additional potential setbacks in the implementation of the EU-led Belgrade-Pristina dialogue,” Zahir Tanin, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Kosovo and Head of UNMIK told the Security Council. Meanwhile, he said reconciliation also requires enhanced effort to determine the fate of persons missing from the conflict, with more than 1,600 persons still unaccounted for. He echoed the Secretary-General’s message on the importance of continued progress in the process of the establishment of the Specialist Court, as agreed between the European Union and Kosovo. http://bit.ly/1jaHT7L

Time stands still for the mothers of…